Sh*t.

Standard

I hate having meltdowns. So I had two on Sunday. Sort of because my neck was killing me and Tylenol doesn’t cut it. And the chiropractor wasn’t in (lazy sod).  Retaliated by eating three ice cream bars. That helped. Then I got proactive and watched “Mastectomy and You”–the DVD my surgeon assigned. Like I get brownie points for  writing a book report. Or returning it on time. Like the stupid thing’s gonna help.

Should have been more protective of my mushy mind. Choose one source of information and stick to it, I say to my patients. Do I take my own advice? Noooo. The DVD pics bear little resemblance to the ones the plastic surgeon showed me. Not that they’re so bad, they’re just not so good, either. Hence the meltdown.

I swore I wouldn’t cry. Years ago Mom cried enough for both of us, wasting months wailing about which lifesaving procedure would, in fact, save her life. That she had months to waste should have been a clue. Her diagnosis was DCIS–now considered a high-risk precursor, but not cancer itself. Eligible for lumpectomy. In the 70s they didn’t know that and didn’t seriously offer anything other than modified or radical mastectomy. Didn’t offer reconstruction, much, either. If they did, it wasn’t until years after treatment, once survival was pretty much guaranteed. The fear was that reconstructed tissue and thick scarring might make a deep recurrence nearly impossible to see. Misogyny and concern rolled into a tight little bundle. And utterly believable as far as my mom was concerned. Lop off her breasts and replace them with something that could moot the whole point? No thanks.

Lord knows things have changed, and I’m grateful for it. Scoop out the offending bits and deal with the rest later. Unseen recurrence? Not likely. Leave the hospital with something that hurts, but pokes out instead of in? Priceless.

Mom and I were different in lots of ways. I guess every one of us is. After seeing those godawful mastectomy scars every day after my 15th year, the decision was made loooong before I was ever diagnosed. My best friend got leukemia. Possibly an infinitely worse diagnosis than mine. Ended up with stem cells, a stroke and a bald head. She rocked that look. Mom and her concave chest? Not so much. My aunt (her younger sister) didn’t even want to try it. Diagnosed two different times, she was stuck with two different reconstructions because silicone wasn’t on offer the first time. Her words to me? “Just do it.” No matter what the technique, just do it.

And her advice, I’ll take.

4 responses »

  1. Hey, meltdowns are good for the soul. Whatever it takes to push through things – push through anything, not just this! Blogging good too – I used FB to get through Sharon’s. verbalizing’s a much needed outlet and too many people don’t use it!! We’ll try to call during the weekend, but know we’re always there with you in spirit! Love you Kay!! 👩👸👵😻🐶🐟 – in other words 💖 from all of us up north! 😘

  2. as a midwife, I appreciate the “push through the pain” mentality, however, as a woman I also know the benefit of “lay down and cry, rest, cry and then sleep” mentality. Gentle with yourself love, you will need yourself later.
    xoxoxo

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